Bagna Càuda Days: Let’s Celebrate like the Italians do!

The 23rd, 24th and 25th of November are the Bagna Cauda days and to get ready for this occasion we got the original recipe and pictures from Tipici astigiani (many thanks for that!!).

The Bagna Cauda, meaning hot sauce, originally comes from Asti. It is a city located in the Piedmont region of northwestern Italy. In this city, in the past it was very common to find the main ingredient to prepare this tasty sauce: the anchovies in salt.

The Bagna Cauda is served in a Fojòt, a traditional glazed terra cotta bowl. It is composed of an upper bowl suited to contain the Bagna Cauda and a lower part where to put a small candle to keep the sauce warm.

This is more than a simple dish, as it is a social ritual where all the guests gather around a dinner table, dipping vegetables into the Bagna Cauda and sipping a good fruity red wine from Piemonte (like a Barbera d’Asti). At the end of the dinner, the etiquette expects to finish with an abundant cup of hot beef broth.

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Scampi alla busara: a Traditional fish-dish from Trieste

Despite its controversial origin (Croatia? Venetian Laguna? Trieste?), “Scampi alla busara” is nowadays one of the most appreciated dishes of the Triestine cuisine and of the gastronomic tradition of the High Adriatic.

The origin of the name buzara or busara is unclear.  For some people, the dialect Venetian word  “busiaro” means “liar”, because the Venetian fishermen cooked crayfishy scraps with tomatoes and wine pretending it to be a delicious soup. Others think that the term derives from the iron pot used to prepare it.

 Keep reading and get ready for plenty of crusty bread to clean up the sauce!

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