All Souls’s Day Hazelnut Chocolate Torrone

The All Souls’s day is a Catholic festivity occurring on November 2nd, right after All Saints’ Day. Processions and recurrences occur and gifts are donated to so called “good children” the night between 1 and 2 November all over Italy. This is all done in memory of the dead, which are honoured by their relatives on the 2nd of November.

In Naples, the people use to prepare edible offerings, such as this Hazelnut Chocolate Torrone. Translated from Italian, this is called “Torrone of The Dead”. What a spooky name! This Torrone is made by layering chocolate,  to create a crunchy crust, filled with a satisfying cream of chocolate and hazelnut. This is just perfect to cheer you up during these sad days of remembrance.

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El Bicerin – from Turin

Perk up your lazy Monday with El Bicerin (which means small glass in Piedmontese language). This is a drink born in Turin (in Northern Italy) in the 18th century, in the historical cafe’, which no wonder  is still named El Bicerin.

El Bicerin is a heavenly combination of hot chocolate, espresso coffee and cream layered in a small glass. The best way to savour El Bicerin is to not mix the layers. The secret is to sip the drink leaving its components to melt on the palate, with their different taste, density and temperature.

Try it and you’ll get addicted!

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Terrano (red wine) granita

Terrano wine is cultivated in two European nations, Italy and Slovenia, but the soil is the same: the Carso. The Carso (Karst) is a plain situated above the Central European city of Trieste (in Friuli Venezia Giulia Region of northeastern Italy) and neighboring Slovenia.

Terrano is also known as “Blood of Carso” for its color. This red wine grape is grown on a peculiar bright red soil, beneath which exist thousands of sinkholes.

The combination of a fresh acidity and aromas of forest fruit, make this red wine perfect to prepare a scrumptious and refreshing granita.

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Strawberry semifreddo

This semifreddo cake, as the name suggests, is a partially frozen cake. You don’t need to use any special equipment other than a fridge.

Follow the step-by step recipe to preparing this refreshing and creamy Italian dessert, by using locally grown strawberries which are still at their best in many countries.

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21st March: Tiramisu’ day

 

March 21st has been declared Tiramisu’ day by Eataly. We would like to tell you a story that you might not have heard about the name Tiramisu’ and about the one which could be considered the first Tiramisu’ in the world.

Traditionally Tiramisu’ (that literally means “carry me up”) is a pudding-like dessert that consists of sponge cake or ladyfingers dipped in a liqueur or coffee, then layered with grated chocolate and rich custard. Tiramisù was originally made as a loose custard.  It is only in recent years that using mascarpone cheese has come into fashion: when the Tiramisù was prepared for the first time in 50’s the mascarpone was never been used to prepare a dessert.
Recently a decidedly sour debate has broken out in Italy over when and where Tiramisù was invented.
We can witness that the famous Italian dessert was born in Friuli Venezia Giulia in the ’50s, in the small town of Pieris. The grandmother of one of us was originally from this town and always told her grandchildren that the best Tiramisu’ in the world was the one that was produced by a chef called Mario Cosolo, at his famous restaurant “Al Vetturino”. The recipe of his Tiramisù is always been a secret, appreciated by the illustrious customers of the restaurant and created for the first time on board of the Savoia’s family yacht, by Mario who was working as a cook. At that time the dessert was still called “Coppa Vetturino“.

We never had the luxury to taste it until last February, when we met Flavia Cosolo, the daughter of Mario. We had a very interesting meeting with her, she entertained us telling the real story of her Tiramisù, called in dialect “Tirime su’”. This quirky dialectal expression was given by a customer of the restaurant who fell in love with an attractive waitress, due to the aphrodisiac qualities of the “Coppa Vetturino“.

Food writers Clara and Gigi Padovani revealed the “Tirime su” recipe in their book “Tiramisu – History, curiosities and interpretations of the most loved Italian dessert,” published by Giunti Editore, among with a number of other Tiramisù variations.

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We warmly invite you to try the “Tirime su” version, because, you know … the grandmothers never lie to their grandchildren.

And you can even prepare the Mad & Delicacy version,  here we are!

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Persimmon mousse with cardamom crumble

Persimmon (or Cachi in Italian) is one of the most beautiful autumn fruit, and almost everybody in Italy has a persimmon tree in the backyard.

This is the time of the year when persimmons are harvested and let ripen in a basket together with apples.

To feel the autumn atmosphere, this week we made an easy persimmon mousse using simple ingredients, but giving our recipe a pinch of diversity by using cardamom powder. Persimmon and cardamom are surprisingly a perfect match!

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